Fun Facts: The 1794 Edition Heritage Toyota Tundra

Where did the model name “1794” come from?

2014-Toyota-Tundra-1794-Edition-front-grilleThe home of the Toyota Tundra is a plant located just south of San Antonio, Texas, a property – once the oldest working ranch in Texas, the JLC Ranch – that provides the 1794 Edition legacy name.

The 1794 Edition name originates from the founding year of the JLC ranch which was 1794, when a young colonist from the Canary Islands, Juan Ignacio de Casanova, received a royal grant for a league of rolling pastureland between Leon Creek and the Medina River.

2014-toyota-tundra_100435258_lOn this land, he established El Rancho de la Purisima Concepcion, and later expanded his holdings to more than 24,000 acres. Ignacio later defended San Antonio from Mexican revolutionary forces attempting to break away from Spain. He served briefly as the Spanish Provincial Governor of Texas before his death in October 1823. His son, Jose Ignacio Perez continued to ranch the land.

During the Texas Revolution, Perez remained loyal to the Mexican Government, placing his family on property along the Rio Grande. He continued to pay taxes on the ranch, which helped him reclaim the land when he returned in 1846. The Texas Republic only recognized the original land grant of 4,000 acres.

This was passed on to Perez’s descendants as the JLC Ranch until it was acquired by Toyota in 2003 for the first (and only) pickup truck plant in Texas, at San Antonio. Thus a true Texan truck it is!

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Tundra Takes on Texas and Trailers

2014 Toyota Tundra 4 X 4 1794 CrewMax Truck

I never considered Toyota as a manufacturer that could design a truck to compete with Ford F-150s or a full size Chevy. Toyota is famous for their Camrys , Highlanders and Corollas and were late bloomers in the full-size truck segment of the market.

Tundra 1784Don’t get me wrong, I’ve test driven a Toyota Tundra before, and thought it was great, but for real Texans to show up in a Toyota Truck it would have to be bigger than Southfork, and prettier than a Dallas Cowboy’s cheerleader on game day.

I wanted a truck that I could tow my vintage l4-ft. travel trailer to a fundraiser in Cave Creek, Arizona. I had access to a Ford F-150 and a big Chevy Silverado but wanted to give the Toyota 1784 Tundra edition a go at it, especially around ‘truck folk’.

Travel Trailer and TundraWhen I got into the truck I sat down on the softest of leather seats, complete with the aroma of new leather that I inhaled for a moment.  It reminded me of the days when a man wore English Leather and I would linger around his neck to get the full experience.  I couldn’t help but feel above it all in the cab, and with the adjustment of the seat and the steering column, I was happy to just sit and look around for five minutes.  Each place I observed and touched I kept saying … this is beautiful, look at the detail here, check out the color of the truck and the color of the upholstery, everywhere I looked I was amazed.

Once I got out of the truck, Cathy Burford and I hitched our “work in progress” trailer to the Tundra, just like a bunch of real ranch hands and cattle herders (OK, that was an exaggeration), but when we take off our high heels we can get pretty rough and tumble.   However, after hitching and driving the tundra we found it so easy we realized we could have kept our heels on.

AZ Fly Girls Inside Trailer Upper shelfOur trailer ( AZFly Girls) isn’t restored yet  on the outside, but the beauty of the 1784 truck towing it made up for that. The minute I started driving, I felt like a real cowgirl and wished I was going to a rodeo.  We met men and women who stopped by the event who owned other brand trucks and wanted a tour of the Tundra as well as the inside of our trailer.

We belong to a group of women called Sister’s on the Fly and there are at least4,000 members across the USA and 75% of them tow and drive a full size truck. Wouldn’t Toyota want to be the truck of choice for these women? After last week, I think the 1784 Tundra will be on many a truck buyer’s shopping list.  My favorite two things about the 1784 Tundra 4X4 are the large center console filing cabinet and the floor mats with a center section to clean your shoe or boot or high heel.

Tundra l784 LogoSo many great things happened that day; we towed the trailer behind the full-size, Tundra CrewMax 4X4, met great people who enjoy restored trailers, vintage décor,  love of the outdoors and driving trucks. We raised money for our charity and introduced and drove a truck that was much like a living room on wheels.  Next we’ll hook the Tundra up to a horse trailer, then a boat, and maybe a ….

Standard and Optional Equipment

5.7 –liter, COHC i-Force V-8 -381 Horsepower at 5,600 rpm and 401 lb-ft of torque at 3,600 rpm.

Gas mileage 15 City l7 Highway

Six –speed electronically controlled automatic transmission

Blind spot monitor with Rear Cross Traffic Alert

20-inch Chrome Clad Wheels and Bedliner

Prices starting at $43,000 Test Vehicle $49,715.00

Fun Facts: The 1794 Edition Heritage

Where did the model name “1794” come from?

The home of the Toyota Tundra is a plant located just south of San Antonio, Texas, a property – once the oldest working ranch in Texas, the JLC Ranch – that provides the 1794 Edition legacy name.

The 1794 Edition name originates from the founding year of the JLC ranch which was 1794, when a young colonist from the Canary Islands, Juan Ignacio de Casanova, received a royal grant for a league of rolling pastureland between Leon Creek and the Medina River.

On this land, he established El Rancho de la Purisima Concepcion, and later expanded his holdings to more than 24,000 acres. Ignacio later defended San Antonio from Mexican revolutionary forces attempting to break away from Spain. He served briefly as the Spanish Provincial Governor of Texas before his death in October 1823. His son, Jose Ignacio Perez continued to ranch the land.

During the Texas Revolution, Perez remained loyal to the Mexican Government, placing his family on property along the Rio Grande. He continued to pay taxes on the ranch, which helped him reclaim the land when he returned in 1846. The Texas Republic only recognized the original land grant of 4,000 acres.

This was passed on to Perez’s descendants as the JLC Ranch until it was acquired by Toyota in 2003 for the first (and only) pickup truck plant in Texas, at San Antonio. Thus a true Texan truck it is!